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Try These Auto Attendant Script Examples

Auto Attendant Phone Script ExamplesWhen you’re getting started with your VirtualPBX Business Phone System, one of the first features you’ll want to configure is your Automated Attendant.

Today, we’ll try to make that task a little easier. You can use these auto attendant script examples for your small startup, medium-size business, or large enterprise.

We’ve broken down our scripts by business size. There are two scripts for each type – a formal and informal – and each one is free for you to modify.

Small Business Auto Attendant Script Examples

Small businesses are unique in their needs. They often have fewer employees, less resources, and smaller storefront footprints than their counterparts.

Small business bakeryA small business’s phone system, however, must be as robust as its resolve to conquer those challenges. An Automated Attendant, in particular, will need to route calls efficiently while conveying the capabilities of the business in question.

Your callers should get a sense of your size from the first second they reach your phone tree. This will set the stage for the personal interactions the caller should expect upon reaching one of your employees. Even if you run a small business by yourself, these two scripts are for you.

Informal Script

  • Introduction: “Hi, this is Carla from the Main Street Bakery. I hope you’re having a great day.
    “Our bakery is open Monday through Friday from 9 to 7. See our collection of cakes at beautiful 123 Main Street, or online any time at 123MainBakery.com.
    “Press 1 for our main reception or 2 for special orders. We take custom orders for individuals and groups.”

This script allows the personalization of the business owner to shine. It favors a warm greeting and well-wishing over the technical details of the business-customer interaction. That said, the greeting is short so the hours, location, and phone tree options are presented quickly to the caller.

Formal Script

  • Introduction: “You’ve reach the Main Street Bakery – open weekdays 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and online at 123MainBakery.com.
    “Press 1 for reception or 2 for special orders. We take custom orders for individuals and groups.”

Here you can see the personalized greeting removed. Instead, the location and hours of the business are placed at the front. Callers receive the necessary information about the business’s hours and location so the can easily decide how to take action.

Medium-Size Business Scripts

Medium-size businesses occupy a space that requires the personal touch of a small outfit but the technical capability of an enterprise. They’re expected to have enough personnel and resources to quickly resolve customer concerns and promptly ship orders.

Medium size business board game shopThis requires that the medium-size player present itself as both a sensitive listener and an imposing market force. The automated attendant script examples shown below set the stage for that balancing act.

In your own business, take the time here to modify these examples so they clearly show your business’s capabilities. Extend the department list for as long as necessary – keeping in mind that customer patience with automated systems is limited. When menus take too long to list or contain more than five items, customers have been shown to take their business elsewhere because they’re too frustrated to continue.

Informal Script

  • Introduction: “At Top of the Line Board Games, we’re happy to have your business.
    “Visit our gaming store at 555 Gameway Blvd., from 7a to 7p, 7 days a week. Find games online at TopLineBoardGames.com.
    “Dial 1 for the front desk; 2 for customer support; or 3 for manufacturing.”
    “Thanks. And have a great day.”

This script, like all those you’ll see in this article, gets to the point. Although it does prioritize a welcoming introduction, it’s offers a short description of the location and hours. It also breaks down the company departments into three distinct groups.

The final send-off – “Have a great day.” – won’t interfere with the caller’s ability to make an informed choice. It bookends the professionalism suggested in the menu that displays a store front, customer support department, and manufacturing department.

Formal Script

  • Introduction: “You’ve reached Top of the Line Board Games. Visit our 555 Gameway Blvd. location any day, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Or find us online at TopLineBoardGames.com.
    “Dial 1 for the front desk; 2 for customer support; or 3 for manufacturing.
    “Thank you for your business. We’ll speak with you soon.”

In this case, the friendly greeting is replaced by the name and details of the business’s operating hours. The menu is still short and clear. Then there’s room for the send-off at the close of the message.

With no fluff, the caller is ready to interact with the business in no greater than 20 seconds. They’re also reassured that they will soon speak to a business representative.

Enterprise Business Scripts

Enterprises, with their hundreds of employees and multiple national and global locations, get a reputation for being gruff. They’re all about the business and forgo personal interaction, right?

Enterprise business machiningIt doesn’t have to be that way. VirtualPBX enterprise features give large companies the ability to smoothly handle customer interactions. In addition, our succinct auto attendant script examples for enterprises show how even the largest of businesses can blend production capability and solid customer service.

Your enterprise will need to work hard to keep its auto attendant menu short. By presenting callers with only a few options, you’ll keep their attention. Furthermore, a concise menu leaves room for a friendly greeting as shown in our first example script below.

Informal Script

  • Introduction: “Welcome to Global Metal Machining. We take pride in our custom materials and our customer service.
    “Use the following list for information and to reach our departments. Dial 0, at any time, to reach an operator.
    “Press 1 to place an order; 2 to check an order’s status; 3 for billing concerns; 4 for other customer service concerns; and 5 for locations and hours.
    “Thank you for doing business with us.”

This script is a bit longer than our others for small and midsize businesses. Even so, it takes no longer than 20 seconds to speak.

Your automated attendant would present a light touch in this situation. The introduction welcomes visitors, which indicates your attitude toward doing business with them. You also briefly present your product in the opening sentence.

By clearly making an operator available at option 0, you’re saying that your door is always open. The menu items are also logically placed in order of importance. Your hours and website sit within a sub-menu, so callers aren’t bothered by those particulars which might be less important to a manufacturing company than to a food service or board gaming outfit.

Formal Script

  • Introduction: “Welcome to Global Metal Machining.
    “For information and to reach individual departments, use the following list. Dial 0, at any time, to reach an operator.
    “Press 1 to place an order; 2 to check an order’s status; 3 for billing concerns; 4 for other customer service concerns; and 5 for locations and hours.
    “Thank you for doing business with us.”

This script highlights one important change: the introduction. In our informal script above, the business states its product (custom metal materials) and its intention (high-quality customer service).

The formal iteration here takes away those elements; it dives directly into the menu. In doing so, it saves callers a few seconds, which can feel like forever in these types of situations.

Neither enterprise script here is right or wrong. They just offer different approaches to the same task. If you want more formality in your presentation, choose this script.

Notice that both these scripts include a “thank you.” There’s always room to be polite and thank your customer for their business.

Consider Your Needs as a Business

Before adopting and revising one of these auto attendant script examples, take a few minutes to consider the needs of your business.

Do you prefer an informal or formal approach? How can you whittle down your listing of departments and menu options to five or fewer? Is it important, up front, to list your location, hours, and website?

These basic inquiries will help you pick an auto attendant script that’s right for you and your customers. One that’s easy to create, quick to hear, and simple to navigate.